Posted by - General.

We gathered in a medium-sized classroom for the wrap-up session of my two-day board meeting at my alma mater. Most sessions were in larger spaces, with presenters using a lectern at the front of a well-miked room. The event organizers always saved me a seat at the front with good sight-lines to the speakers so I could lipread as needed. I really appreciated their assistance and was able to hear almost everything. Given the high level of concentration needed, my hearing loss exhaustion usually kicked in by the end of the day, but it was worth it. Read more

Posted by - General.

I recently learned that the average age of first-time hearing aid wearers is around 70. I’m a good deal younger than that, so how did I get here? While it’s impossible to know the exact cause, I blame most of my hearing loss on the insanely loud concerts I went to in my younger years. I also blame the noisy car I drove. The exhaust headers were so loud that I had to blast the radio just to hear the music over the sound of the car. Read more

Posted by - Hearing Aids.

Driving with hearing loss can be challenging, however, especially if you are pulled over for a traffic violation. Many states are now printing special visor cards that people with hearing loss can use to communicate their hearing loss to police officers. The cards typically declare, “I am Deaf or Hard of Hearing” in big letters at the top and may contain tips for communicating with someone with hearing loss below. Often there are pictures of driver’s licenses, registration cards, traffic lights, etc. to aid in communication. Read more

Posted by - General.

This might be you. A suspicion has been growing louder in your mind. It nags at you but you’re denying it. And you could be right – maybe you don’t have hearing loss. Maybe it’s just wax. Maybe other people are mumbling. Maybe you’re overtired and don’t have the focus. Maybe it’s all that damn noise! If you’re like thousands of other people, you’ve been waging a years-long internal battle with yourself. Read more

Posted by - General.

Every year at my annual medical check-up, the doctor checks my height and weight, listens to my heart and takes my blood pressure. She scans my skin for any moles that might have changed, looks at my eyes, my ears and down my throat. She orders blood work, and sometimes even other tests, but never, not once, has she tested my hearing or even asked me about it. Read more

Posted by - General.

While the solution to background noise is still be over the horizon, real progress has been made on improving sound quality and listening comfort through machine learning. The results of a recent double-blind study suggest that machine-learning can assist hearing aid users in more effectively finding their ideal sound settings; sound settings that lead to greater sound quality and listening comfort in a variety of difficult listening settings. Read more

Posted by - General.

I was lucky to present recently at the American Academy of Audiology’s annual convention in Nashville held April 18-21, 2018. You can read about my presentation here. It was a fascinating experience to attend an audiology conference, not as an audiologist, but as a patient. It was interesting to attend the various educational sessions for the audiologists, listen in on the latest product launches from the hearing aid manufacturers, and walk the expansive exhibition hall to explore new and innovative products for people with hearing loss. I am so glad I attended. Read more

Posted by - Hearing Aids.

Phonak is the first to release rechargeable hearing aids across an entire family of behind-the-ear devices. This means rechargeable solutions for their latest Belong™ processing platform are now available for children and adults, and for almost any degree of hearing loss. With their new wireless CROS B-R, Phonak has even provided a rechargeable solution for those suffering from single-sided deafness. Read more

Posted by - General.

Hearing loss sneaks up on people gradually, so it is sometimes difficult to detect oneself. Often, friends and family are the first to notice. The average person waits 7-10 years before treating their hearing loss. Part of this is due to stigma, but part is not knowing the steps to take to find out more about hearing loss and to construct a plan for treatment. Here are my tips for taking the first few steps along your hearing loss journey. Please share your ideas in the comments. Read more