Posted by - General.

This might be you. A suspicion has been growing louder in your mind. It nags at you but you’re denying it. And you could be right – maybe you don’t have hearing loss. Maybe it’s just wax. Maybe other people are mumbling. Maybe you’re overtired and don’t have the focus. Maybe it’s all that damn noise! If you’re like thousands of other people, you’ve been waging a years-long internal battle with yourself. Read more

Posted by - General.

Every year at my annual medical check-up, the doctor checks my height and weight, listens to my heart and takes my blood pressure. She scans my skin for any moles that might have changed, looks at my eyes, my ears and down my throat. She orders blood work, and sometimes even other tests, but never, not once, has she tested my hearing or even asked me about it. Read more

Posted by - General.

Hearing loss sneaks up on people gradually, so it is sometimes difficult to detect oneself. Often, friends and family are the first to notice. The average person waits 7-10 years before treating their hearing loss. Part of this is due to stigma, but part is not knowing the steps to take to find out more about hearing loss and to construct a plan for treatment. Here are my tips for taking the first few steps along your hearing loss journey. Please share your ideas in the comments. Read more

Posted by - General.

I love to travel, attend concerts, and live sporting events, but as my hearing loss has worsened, I have become more sensitive to loud sounds. More frequently, the aftermath of a plane flight or visit to a stadium was a long bout of tinnitus and sometimes, even vertigo. It just wasn’t worth it, until I discovered noise-cancelling headphones. I wear them almost everywhere now — on airplanes, at the movies and of course at any concert or loud stadium. Not only do they protect my hearing in the moment, they prevent days of pain and annoyance afterwards. Read more

Posted by - Guest Post.

Hearing loss continues to affect a growing, and increasingly younger, portion of the population. And many individuals who experience hearing loss, choose not to act on it. If you think hearing loss isn’t that big of a deal, or that you can get along just fine without getting your hearing loss treated, you’re mistaken. Hearing loss affects all aspects of your life, from your own health and happiness to your relationships with those most important to you. Read more

Posted by - Hearing Health.

When music is played at high volume, earbuds deliver louder sound exposures than over-the-ear headphones. And they deliver them directly into the ear. That’s why the music may sound incredible but still carries greater risks when it comes to damaging hearing. The unfortunate news is that hearing loss from loud sounds isn’t recoverable, meaning that once you damage the little hair cells deep in your ear they don’t grow back and that part of your hearing is lost for good. Read more

Posted by - General.

Hearing loss can make conversations more challenging. Often we must rely on our conversation partners to practice communication best practices like facing us when they speak and providing context before changing topics. But communication is a two-way street. There are also many things we can do to enhance our ability to have successful and productive interactions with others. By following some simple rules of thumb, we can put ourselves in a better position to hear and communicate as best as is possible. Read more

Posted by - General.

Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays — delicious food, good spirits and lively gatherings of family and friends. But with my hearing loss, I sometimes worry I will miss out on some of the fun. Large dining room tables make conversation tricky, especially, like in my family, if everyone is talking at once. Background chatter combined with noise from the football games on television add to the overall din, making it a tough listening situation. What is a person with hearing loss to do? Follow these tips and have a very Happy Thanksgiving! Read more