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Best Rechargeable Hearing Aids for 2023: Comparing the Options

"Rechargeable hearing aids dominate the market in 2023, and it's now possible to purchase both behind-the-ear and in-the-ear rechargeable hearing aids."
Phonak Audéo Lumity Chargers

Chargers for Phonak's Lumity hearing aids.

Since Phonak introduced the first hearing aids with an integrated lithium-ion rechargeable battery in 2016, all other major brands have followed suit with rechargeable models. That's because ongoing improvements are constantly increasing battery life and enabling smaller and more flexible form factors. The recent MarkeTrak 2022 survey of consumers indicated over half (52%) of hearing aid users now own rechargeable devices.

Rechargeable hearing aid guide

Given the range of choices now available, we have put together a comprehensive guide to the best rechargeable hearing aids for 2023. Click on the links below for detailed information on each topic, or read on for more background on rechargeable hearing aids.

Rechargeable versus disposable

Do you ever forget to charge your cell phone at night, only to have it die halfway through the next day? Do you spend a lot of time “off the grid” without access to electricity? Are you a power user who streams audio to your hearing aids 16 hours a day? If you answered yes to any of these questions, there’s a possibility that rechargeable hearing aids aren’t your best choice. Hearing aids with disposable batteries may work better for you.

But if you’re accustomed to recharging your phone and would prefer not to have to change your hearing aid batteries, you're not alone. In fact, hearing aid users have made it clear they would generally prefer rechargeable hearing aids over their disposable-battery counterparts.

In 2016, HearingTracker surveyed US consumers about their rechargeability preferences after two industry leaders, Phonak and Signia, each announced upcoming hearing aid models with lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. Of the 510 hearing-aid owners who responded to our survey, 89% said their aids used non-rechargeable disposable batteries, but 70% said they would prefer rechargeable hearing aids.

Four years later, in May 2020, we polled the members of our Facebook support group and found a huge jump in rechargeable hearing aid ownership, up to about 30% from 11% in 2016.

79%
of RIC & BTE hearing aids sold in 2021 that were rechargeable
87%
of all hearing aids sold that were RICs or BTEs

At the end of 2021, a whopping 4 out of 5 (79.4%) Receiver-in-Canal (RIC) and Behind-the-Ear (BTE) hearing aids sold in the U.S. were rechargeable, and these two hearing aid styles accounted for 87% of all hearing aid sales, according to Hearing Industries Association (HIA) statistics. As noted earlier, the MarkeTrak consumer survey indicates that about half (52%) of current hearing aid owners use rechargeable aids.

It's clear that consumers are increasingly voting with their wallets in favor of rechargeables. Indeed, the world's largest hearing aid manufacturer, Phonak, opted to launch its flagship Lumity RIC products only in rechargeable models in 2022 without any disposable battery option.

But rechargeable hearing aids have their upsides and downsides. Here are the top-6 things to consider before purchasing rechargeable hearing aids for yourself or a loved one:

  • Manageability - Hearing aids are small devices that require a lot of manual dexterity. Sometimes older adults or very young kids have trouble getting them into their ears, turning them on and off and, especially, changing those tiny batteries. Rechargeable hearing aids with built-in lithium-ion batteries eliminate that dexterity challenge.
  • Cost - Rechargeable hearing aids generally cost more than hearing aids that use disposables. But constantly replacing disposable batteries with new ones can cost $50 dollars or more per year, depending on how much power your hearing aids draw. So, in comparing hearing aid prices, keep in mind the extra cost of ownership of disposable-battery hearing aids.
  • Environmental concerns - The carbon footprint of rechargeable batteries is significantly smaller (better) than disposable batteries. Rechargeable batteries in hearing aids are generally expected to last for 5 years or more, so you don’t have to worry about recycling very often. Disposables last only a few days to a little over a week, so you have to recycle them frequently (or feel guilty for tossing them in the trash).
  • One charge per day - Until recently, rechargeable hearing aid batteries failed to meet the one-charge-per-day standard that consumers have become accustomed to with their mobile phones. Earlier batteries based on nickel metal hydride technology suffered from shorter life and less stable power output. But new lithium-ion batteries last all day, making an overnight charge easy and convenient.
  • Convenience - If you don’t want to carry around spare packs of batteries everywhere you go, rechargeable hearing aids are a great solution. On the flip side, you do need to remember to charge rechargeable hearing aids every night. Forgetting to place them in the charger at night can mean the difference between hearing and not the following day.
  • Power outages - For campers, frequent travelers, or people who live in areas frequently hit by hurricanes and natural disasters (i.e., with long power outages), you might encounter extended periods when its difficult to plug in your recharger. In these cases, hearing aids with disposable batteries can be a safer option.

When you look at the pros and cons, it’s clear both disposable hearing aid batteries and rechargeable hearing aids are here to stay. Which you choose depends on your specific needs.

Frequently asked questions about rechargeables

Rechargeable hearing aids are most often premium products from top hearing aid brands. So prices for a pair can range anywhere from approximately $2,500 to $6,000, depending on what other features and functions they have.

Most rechargeable hearing aid manufacturers promise a full day of use on a single charge, so the batteries can be recharged overnight while you are sleeping. The length of time batteries hold their charge varies depending on how the hearing aids are being used. If you stream audio from your phone many hours a day, the batteries will run down faster.

Yes. One downside of a rechargeable hearing aid is that, like a cell phone (or any rechargeable device), they gradually lose charging capacity over time. Most lithium-ion hearing aid batteries last for about 5 years, but their power capacity decreases in that time. For example, after one year of use, a rechargeable hearing aid may be able to operate at 85% of what it did when new (e.g., if it could operate for 30 hours with no streaming when new, it may only operate for 25 hours after the first year). This is why, if possible, it's a good idea to have the rechargeable batteries in your hearing aids replaced by your hearing care professional sometime before your manufacturer warranty expires (typically 2-3 years).

Li-ion hearing aid batteries are very safe because they are always sealed in the hearing aid’s case. If the case breaks, you should stop using the hearing aid and have it serviced.

Some electronic products with larger lithium-ion batteries can’t be left in checked baggage. But lithium-ion hearing aids have passed safety checks that let you check them in baggage. You can also wear your hearing aids on airplanes and other public transportation.

Lithium-ion rechargeable batteries

All of the global hearing aid manufacturers now offer lithium-ion rechargeable hearing aids. They utilize the same technology found in your mobile phone and hundreds of other rechargeable consumer products. Providing a strong combination of energy and power density, they can now yield more than a full day of power for hearing aids, even when paired with power-hungry Bluetooth devices. And thanks to their consistent power output, users don’t experience the malfunctions or intermittence that limited hearing aids based on earlier rechargeable technologies.

Consumers have generally given most of these premium-level rechargeable hearing aids high marks for performance and ease of use. And they are proving to be reliable, too.

No more battery door

For safety and performance reasons, lithium-ion batteries are sealed into the cases of hearing aids. Unlike hearing aids with replaceable disposable batteries, they don't have battery doors. That's a benefit to users who sometimes have difficulty manipulating the small controls on hearing aids and who are happy to have one less moving part to worry about.

Sealed batteries also provide better moisture, dirt, and debris protection for the hearing aids. You'll find that many of the highest quality rechargeable hearing aids have ingress protection (IP) ratings of IP68—the highest possible level for these types of devices—and have extra protection due to the sealed battery.

Top rechargeable hearing aids in 2023

Rechargeable hearing aids dominate the market in 2023, and it's now possible to purchase both behind-the-ear and in-the-ear rechargeable hearing aids. Here is a list of the top rechargeable hearing aids from the world's leading brands.

Phonak rechargeable hearing aids

Phonak’s Audéo B hearing aid was the the first to use lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. Since then, Phonak has expanded its line of rechargeable hearing aids to most behind-the-ear product families, all using lithium-ion technology.

Audéo Lumity is Phonak's latest flagship hearing aid, and the first to run on AutoSense OS™ 5.0, which is designed to deliver new speech enhancements and directional microphone features for improved listening in background noise. Lumity comes only in rechargeable Receiver-in-Canal (RIC) models with a push-button, and options for telecoil and enhanced waterproof protection.

Phonak Audéo Lumity

3.5 stars stars
7 reviews

Listed prices are for a pair of hearing aids in US dollars unless otherwise specified. Prices may change over time, and may vary by region.

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Charger Case Go

Charger Case Go

Phonak Charger Case Go features a built-in battery that can charge two hearing aids up to three times. Both chargers use a standard USB-C charging port and the LED on the back lightens up when power is applied.

Functions

  • Battery Charger

Compatible Aids

Charger Ease

Charger Ease

Charges Audéo L-R and RT hearing aids in just three hours so you can enjoy a full day of hearing.

Functions

  • Battery Charger

Compatible Aids

In 2022, Phonak introduced Audéo Fit, a rechargeable RIC hearing aid with health tracking features, including step counting and heart rate monitoring. Fit hasn't been launched on the new Lumity platform, so you'll have to jump back to the Paradise family to get the health features. The company also has rechargeable models for its earlier Marvel and Belong technology platforms—including Audéo M R and RT, Audéo B R, Bolero B PR, and the Naída B-R rechargeable hearing aids.

Oticon rechargeable hearing aids

Oticon's flagship hearing aid, Real, is currently offered in two rechargeable models: miniRITE (receiver-in-the-ear) and miniBTE (behind-the-ear) rechargeable, all with telecoils and in 3 technology levels. The rechargeable versions use the new Oticon Smartcharger and gives you a full day of battery life (16-22 hours) on a full charge, and 6 hours of battery life with a quick 30-minute charge.

Oticon Real

4.5 stars stars
3 reviews

Listed prices are for a pair of hearing aids in US dollars unless otherwise specified. Prices may change over time, and may vary by region.

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SmartCharger

SmartCharger

The new SmartCharger includes a protective lid and built-in battery for charging when away from a power outlet. The drying function automatically removes moisture from your hearing aids.

Functions

  • Battery Charger

Oticon Zircon is a quality lower-cost miniBTE and miniRITE option launched in 2022 built on the new Polaris chip platform. Although Zircon is considered “essential” technology, it has kept some of the key features of BrainHearing available in Oticon’s premium products including audio streaming and hands-free calling for iOS devices, speech rescue, tinnitus support, and a choice between a portable charger that carries 3 full charges or desktop charger.

Oticon Zircon

2.5 stars stars
7 reviews

Listed prices are for a pair of hearing aids in US dollars unless otherwise specified. Prices may change over time, and may vary by region.

Oticon also offers rechargeable miniRITE R and miniBTE hearing aids in the Oticon Real family, as well as in a miniRITE R in Oticon Play PX family for children.

ReSound rechargeable hearing aids

Nexia is ReSound's newest flagship hearing aid family, offering rechargeability and the first-ever Bluetooth LE and Auracast broadcasting capabilities for hearing aids. The Nexia Micro RIE is 25% smaller than the company's previous standard RIEs and offers new tap controls for user convenience. ReSound OMNIA, the previous flagship line, provides a greater variety of hearing aid styles, including custom and BTEs form factors. Both lines offer “360 All-Around Directionality,” the unique M&RIE technology option, and are designed for better hearing in noise. The rechargeable hearing aids come with a choice of three different chargers: desktop, standard, or the premium charger (shown below).

ReSound Nexia

5 stars stars
1 review

Listed prices are for a pair of hearing aids in US dollars unless otherwise specified. Prices may change over time, and may vary by region.

ReSound OMNIA

4.5 stars stars
6 reviews

Listed prices are for a pair of hearing aids in US dollars unless otherwise specified. Prices may change over time, and may vary by region.

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Premium Charger

Premium Charger

Charges device when connected to power outlet, and also holds up to three full charges due to its onboard battery.

Custom OMNIA devices fit the unique shape of your ear and offer a full suite of advanced features, including twin directional microphones, Bluetooth streaming, and high water resistance. The charger also features custom inserts that match the shape of the earmold and ensure good electrical contact when charging.

ReSound OMNIA

4.5 stars stars
6 reviews

Listed prices are for a pair of hearing aids in US dollars unless otherwise specified. Prices may change over time, and may vary by region.

Resound also still sells ReSound ONE, the predecessor to OMNIA, in some markets. And, the company offers rechargeable models in its economy ReSound Key product line.

Signia rechargeable hearing aids

Signia recently introduced its new Integrated Xperience (IX) platform with the Signa IX hearing aid family designed to provide sound clarity and definition for hearing aid wearers in dynamic, moving, multi-speaker scenarios. Launched in October 2023, the line currently consists of the rechargeable Pure Charge&Go IX and TIX (the latter with a telecoil) RIC hearing aids, and the Silk Charge & Go IX, the only instant-fit rechargeable Completely-in-Canal (CIC) hearing aid on the market.

Signia Pure Charge&Go IX

4 stars stars
1 review

Listed prices are for a pair of hearing aids in US dollars unless otherwise specified. Prices may change over time, and may vary by region.

Signia also offers both its Pure AX and Pure Charge&Go AX hearing aids in rechargeable models. Pure AX is Signia’s first hearing aid launched under the company’s Augmented Xperience (AX) platform, offering streaming for iOS (hands free) and Android devices, acoustic motion sensors, and own voice processing. Three different chargers are available depending on your needs and preferences: the standard Pure charger, portable charger, and the Dry&Clean charger.

Launched in 2022, Styletto AX is a slim-bodied hearing aid designed for mild to moderate losses, and it fits comfortably behind most ears to play well with glasses.

Signia Styletto AX

4.5 stars stars
2 reviews

Listed prices are for a pair of hearing aids in US dollars unless otherwise specified. Prices may change over time, and may vary by region.

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Additionally, Insio Charge&Go AX, introduced in October 2021, was the first wireless-charging custom In-the-Ear (ITE) hearing aid—bringing rechargeability to much smaller and discreet styles of hearing aids.

Signia Insio Charge&Go AX

4.5 stars stars
4 reviews

Listed prices are for a pair of hearing aids in US dollars unless otherwise specified. Prices may change over time, and may vary by region.

Signia also offers a complementary broad range of rechargeable hearing aids for different budgets and needs. Charge&Go X models provide overnight recharging, and Styletto X hearing aids come with a portable Qi-enabled charger for use when traveling. The portable charger gives 3 full charges to a pair of hearing aids, meaning wearers get 4 full days of hearing aid use without having to plug in. Signia Active X is an earbud-style instant-fit hearing aid that provides up to 26 hours of listening time on a 3-hour charge, and can also provide about 3 hours time on a 30-minute quick charge.

Charger with Qi-Charger Pad

Charger with Qi-Charger Pad

Functions

  • Battery Charger

Widex rechargeable hearing aids

Widex MOMENT SHEER sRIC is one of the smallest rechargeable lithium-ion Receiver-in-Canal (RIC) hearing aids on the market. The sRIC represents Widex's second foray into lithium-ion technology, succeeding the mRIC, and features redesigned microphone ports so it’s easier and more comfortable to hear, process, place, and discern sounds in even the most complex listening environments. The SHEER sRIC also has a new charger that doesn’t have what some users viewed as a cumbersome lid, and it offers 29 hours of listening time on a full charge of 4 hours.

Widex MOMENT

3 stars stars
12 reviews

Listed prices are for a pair of hearing aids in US dollars unless otherwise specified. Prices may change over time, and may vary by region.

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Charger

Charger

The Widex charger comes with brushed anodized aluminum casing, drop-in charging wells, and LED-indicators for charging status.

Functions

  • Battery Charger

Compatible Aids

Starkey rechargeable hearing aids

Starkey Hearing Technologies offers lithium-ion rechargeable hearing aids in its Genesis AI and Evolv AI hearing aid families. The company’s flagship Genesis AI rechargeable RIC hearing aids boast up to 80 million personalized adjustments every hour, 2-way audio for every wireless style, fall alerts, Edge Mode+, language translation, health/activity tracking, and more. Starkey’s new StarLink Premium Mini Charger provides four charges while you're away from a power outlet, with one charge providing up to 51 hours of power to the new Genesis AI RIC RT.

Starkey Genesis AI

3.5 stars stars
8 reviews

Listed prices are for a pair of hearing aids in US dollars unless otherwise specified. Prices may change over time, and may vary by region.

StarLink Premium Mini Charger

StarLink Premium Mini Charger

Unique StarLink Premium Mini Chargers for Genesis AI mRIC R and RIC RT hearing aids – same design but with different charging slots to ensure secure hearing aid placement. These new chargers include on-board turbo charging for three hours of hearing aid use time in just seven minutes of charging and an on-board battery for on-the-go charging.

Functions

  • Battery Charger

Compatible Aids

Unitron rechargeable hearing aids

Unitron Hearing offers rechargeable hearing aids in its Vivante, Blu, and Discover Next hearing aids. The company's Vivante and Blu models provide 24 hours of use on a single charge, and 8 hours of audio/media streaming will allow for a total battery life of 16 hours on a single, full charge. A full charge takes just 3 hours, and 1.5 hours of charging gets you an 80% battery charge.

Unitron Moxi Vivante

5 stars stars
1 review

Listed prices are for a pair of hearing aids in US dollars unless otherwise specified. Prices may change over time, and may vary by region.

Philips rechargeable hearing aids

Sold at Costco, Philips HearLink hearing aid is manufactured by Demant—the parent company of Oticon—so its lithium-ion rechargeable batteries perform well. HearLink 9030 features an AI sound technology that reportedly trains the hearing aid to first listen to speech in noise, then apply the learning to make speech clearer even in noisy environments. The user guide indicates the rechargeable batteries should last between 22-24 hours, depending on whether you are a “light” or “heavy” user. Time to full charge is 3 hours.

How much do rechargeable hearing aids cost?

The first rechargeable hearing aids from the top brands have all been top-performing, premium-priced models. But even in the premium category, there is a broad range of prices. If you check out our local hearing aid discounts, you may see that prices for rechargeable hearing aids can range anywhere from well under $3,000 a pair to nearly $7,000 per pair.

And when you’re assessing prices, consider the total cost of ownership of hearing aids with disposable batteries versus rechargeable hearing aids. Let’s do some math:

  • If you shop around on Amazon for disposable hearing aid batteries, you can purchase them for as little as 30 cents each.
  • If you wear your hearing aids in both ears 16 hours per day, and if you plan on getting about 75 hours of use out of each disposable battery, you end up needing approximately 150 hearing aid batteries a year.
  • That amounts to around $50 per year for batteries.
  • If you keep your hearing aids for five years, the batteries add $250 to their total cost.

Most manufacturer’s warranties run for 2-3 years, but there have been manufacturers that offer warranties specifically covering the rechargeable batteries for longer periods. The bottom line is, if you plan on keeping your hearing aids for more than 5 years, you can save money by getting the rechargeable batteries replaced before the warranty expires. And, when you compare costs with hearing aids that use disposable batteries, keep in mind that paying a couple hundred dollars more for a rechargeable with similar features and performance may provide comparable lifetime value.

Rechargeables now make up the lion’s share of hearing aid sales, and that means more competition, more product-line expansion, and more lower-priced options. If you’re considering a rechargeable hearing aid, be sure to continue checking back here to see what current deals on rechargeable hearing aids are being offered near you.

OTC Rechargeable Hearing Aids

While numerous hearing aids are claiming to belong to the FDA’s new Over-the-Counter (OTC) hearing aid category, only a select few actually make the list as real FDA-cleared OTCs. However, of the top-10 that HearingTracker recently revealed its picks for the Best OTC Hearing Aids of 2023, the vast majority featured rechargeability. These include: Jabra Enhance Plus, Lexie Powered by Bose B2, HP Hearing Pro Eargo 7, MD Hearing Volt Max, Lucid Engage, SoundWorld HD 75R, and Go Prime.

Jabra Enhance Plus

4 stars stars
1 review

Listed prices are for a pair of hearing aids in US dollars unless otherwise specified. Prices may change over time, and may vary by region.

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Lexie Powered by Bose

3.5 stars stars
3 reviews

Listed prices are for a pair of hearing aids in US dollars unless otherwise specified. Prices may change over time, and may vary by region.

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Lucid Hearing Engage

4 stars stars
1 review

Listed prices are for a pair of hearing aids in US dollars unless otherwise specified. Prices may change over time, and may vary by region.

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Eargo 7

5 stars stars
143 reviews

Listed prices are for a pair of hearing aids in US dollars unless otherwise specified. Prices may change over time, and may vary by region.

Busy Café
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Battery life and operating time

When using rechargeable hearing aids, battery life is one of the first concerns that comes to mind. How long will your hearing aids last on a single charge? Rechargeable batteries in hearing aids are actually much better than expected in terms of operational time, and this is thanks to careful power-consumption optimization by the hearing aid companies. When compared to wireless earbuds, which typically only last 4-8 hours, hearing aids are light years ahead, with operating times in the 18-30 hour range.

Battery charge and use time by model

Model Use Time Time to Full Charge
Oticon Real, More, and Zircon 24 hours 3 hours
Phonak Lumity and Paradise 16-18 hours 3 hours
Unitron Vivante and Blu 24 hours 3 hours
ReSound Nexia 24 hours 3 hours
ReSound Omnia and One 30 hours 3 hours
Signia Charge&Go AX 36 hours 4 hours
Signia Styletto AX 20 hours 4 hours
Starkey Genesis AI 41-51 hours* 3.5 hours
Widex MOMENT 20-29 hours* 4 hours
Eargo 5, 6, and 7 16 hours 4 hours
Jabra Enhance Plus 10 hours 3 hours
Lexie Powered by Bose B2 18 hours 3 hours
Lucid Engage 20 hours 2 hours

Estimates of use time assume no wireless streaming. Estimates with wireless streaming are below. *Varies by specific model

There are many factors to keep in mind when reading the operating times published by hearing aid manufacturers. Some of the factors that will lead to less operating time include:

  • Wireless streaming - If you stream wireless audio, this will reduce the operating time of your hearing aids. This includes Bluetooth audio streaming, but also includes using wireless accessories, like remotes.
  • Speaker strength - When your hearing professional configures your hearing aids, they may need to select a higher-powered speaker (a "receiver" in hearing aid lingo) depending on your severity of hearing loss. Higher-powered speakers consumer more power and reduce battery life.
  • Hearing loss severity - If your hearing professional has to crank up the volume to meet your needs, this will use more battery power on an ongoing basis.
  • The age of your battery - After a year or two, your battery will not hold the same charge as it did on Day 1. This is the nature of li-ion batteries, and you should expect to replace your batteries after a few years if they are no longer getting you through the day.
  • Sound environment - If you spend more time in noisy environments, your hearing aids will need to do more heavy duty sound processing in order to provide a cleaner sound, and this chews up the battery faster than minimal processing in quieter environments.

Another important question you may have is “how long will the batteries last before needing to be replaced?” This is a great question, and the answer is, it depends on the hearing aid manufacturer. As mentioned above, all batteries lose their ability to charge over time, and so it really does depend on your needs (in terms of hours of daily use) and the Day 1 capacity and deterioration rate of the specific batteries you’re using. Hearing aid manufacturers often cite a number of years of expected battery life (typically about 5 years), but batteries may last longer or shorter for you depending on the factors above.

Given this fact, if you note that your hearing aids are not charging as fast and/or lasting as long as when you first purchased them, you may consider getting the rechargeable batteries replaced. If they are still covered under the manufacturer's warranty (usually 2-3 years), your hearing care professional might even be able to help you save some money and extend the life of your hearing aids (there may be a service charge for this).

We have attempted to pull together as much information as possible from the literature of the manufacturers, and will be adding to this list over time. Do bookmark this page, and leave a comment in the discussion section below if you wish to contend any of the information cited below! Thanks.

Oticon Real and More

  • 3 hours to fully charge
  • 30-minute charge for 6 hours of use
  • 24 hours total battery life when fully-charged

Oticon Zircon

  • 3 hours to fully charge
  • 24 hours total battery life when fully charged
  • Portable recharger provides 3 full charges and can be recharged without hearing aids in 4 hours or with hearing aids in 8 hours

Phonak Lumity

  • 3 hours to fully charge
  • 18 hours total battery life when fully charged
  • Charger Case Go (portable) holds 3 additional charges

Phonak Paradise

  • 3 hours to fully charge
  • 30-minute charge for 6 hours of use
  • 16 hours including 4 hours of Bluetooth streaming and 4 hours of TV Connector streaming
  • Batteries expected to last 6 years

Resound Nexia

  • 3 hours to fully charge
  • 24 hours on one charge or 20 hours when streaming 50% of the time
  • Premium charger offers a minimum of 3 full charges of 2 hearing aids

Resound Omnia

  • 3 hours to fully charge
  • 30 and 28 hours of battery life when fully charged for HP/UP and MM receivers, respectively
  • Premium charger offers a minimum of 3 full charges of 2 hearing aids

Resound One

  • 3 hours to fully charge
  • 30-minute charge for 8 hours of use
  • 30 hours total battery life when fully-charged
  • 24 hours if streaming for 12 hours

Signia Styletto AX

  • 4 hours to fully charge
  • 20 hours of use total battery life when fully charged
  • 30 minute charge for 5 hours of use

Signia Pure Charge&Go AX

  • 4 hours to fully charge
  • Up to 36 hours of wearing time if utilizing the larger model (T AX) with the telecoil (T-coil) or up to 24 hours for the smaller no T-coil version (AX), including 5 hours of streaming
  • 3 charger models: Standard Pure, portable, and Dry&Clean

Starkey Genesis AI

  • 3.5 hours to fully charge
  • 7-minute charge for 3 hours of use
  • Up to 51 hours total battery life when fully-charged
  • Battery will last a minimum of 4 years

Starkey Evolv AI and Livio AI

  • Under 3 hours to fully charge
  • 7-minute charge for 3.5 hours of use
  • 24 hours total battery life when fully-charged
  • Battery will last a minimum of 3 years

Widex Moment

  • 4 hours to fully charge
  • 20 hours total battery life when fully-charged
  • 30-minute charge for 4 hours of use

Widex Moment Sheer (sRIC R D)

  • 4 hours to fully charge
  • 29 hours total battery life when fully charged or 16 hours with 8 hours of streaming
  • 30-minute charge for 4 hours of use

Unitron Blu and Vivante

  • 3 hours to fully charge
  • 24 hours of battery life when fully charged or 16 hours with 8 hours of media audio/streaming
  • 90 minutes charging provides 80% battery charge

Should you purchase rechargeable hearing aids?

In this 2020 video, Dr. Cliff Olson from Applied Hearing Solutions in Anthem Arizona compares rechargeable and disposable hearing aid batteries, providing good advice for prospective purchasers.

Closed captions are available on this video. If you are using a mobile phone, please enable captions clicking on the gear icon.

HearingTracker independently reviews products and services. When you buy through our links or using our discount codes, we may earn a commission.

Abram Bailey Aud

Founder and President

Dr. Bailey is a leading expert on consumer technology in the audiology industry. He is a staunch advocate for patient-centered hearing care and audiological best practices, and welcomes any technological innovation that improves access to quality hearing outcomes. Dr. Bailey holds an Au.D. from Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

Discussion
Member

I would love to see a comparison chart/spreadsheet instead of reviewing aids one at a time!! this makes it very hard to compare and decide which aids to try.

Abram Bailey, AuD

Hi there and thanks for the comment. Aside from battery charge and use time by model (the table above), what would you like to see included in the comparison? Thanks.

Member

In the spring of 2023 Phonak Canada quoted CDN $ 650 + tax to replace the re-chargeable batteries for my perfectly functioning Phonak Marvel Audeo V 90 aids!

QUOTE FROM MY AUDIOLIGIST'S OFFICE

"The cost to send the hearing aids back to the manufacturer is $650 each and takes between 5 to 10 business days. Your hearing aids are over 4 years old now so it may be better to replace them at this time instead. I have attached a features sheet for Lumity for you to take a look at. If you have further questions, especially technical ones, I would be happy to book an appointment, (a phone appointment if that is more convenient) with an audiologist. Please let me know."

That's CDN $1300 + 13% HST or $1469 for a senior living on a fixed income.

Its long past due the time for Hearing Tracker to do a Cost Comparison of replacing re-chargeable hearing aid batteries across major brands.

Think about it? This is more expensive than a new iPhone!

Does anyone need more evidence to conclude the hearing aid distribution model is out of date?

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